Louis Sorin, a Soarin’ Performer, Scorin’ on Stage, Radio, Television and the Big Screen

Louis Sorin

Louis Sorin

 

Louis Sorin was far better known on stage, than in film, finding a thirty year stint on Broadway, [1] including: Humoresque, 1923, The Constant Nymph, 1927, and The Night Before Christmas, 1941. In late 1941, Sorin replaced Morris Carnovsky, as Mr. Appopolous in, My Sister Eileen.[2] Sorin had steadied his pocket-book, with radio during a decade filled with Broadway flops, but with, My Sister Eileen, he once again found financial stability doing what he loved, being on the stage.[3] My Sister Eileen, finished its initial run at the Biltmore Theatre in early August of 1942, and Sorin did not stay with the production when it changed theaters. Instead, took a part in the operetta, Rosalinda,[4] which afforded Sorin another long term (actually a longer stint than Eileen) position on stage; Rosalinda, opened in late October, 1942 and closed in January of 1944. The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1950, was one of four Broadway plays that followed, Rosalinda, none with significant box-office success. Mr. Sorin’s final bow on the Great White Way was in, Colletor’s Item, which had only three performances, in February of 1952.

One Broadway performance that translated into celluloid work was when Sorin garnered the role of Roscoe Chandler in Animal Crackers, with the Marx Brothers’ on Broadway, in 1928-1929.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Oct_24__1928_

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Wednesday, October 24, 1928

 

Then in the next year he reprised his part of Chandler, in the film version of the Marx Brothers’ comedy-musical, in 1930.

Louis Sorin with Chico and Harpo Marx, in Animal Crackers, 1930

Louis Sorin with Chico and Harpo Marx, in Animal Crackers, 1930

 

Sorin had a leading part in the 1950 film, With These Hands, which featured several other well known Broadway actors. This was his last film appearance; Mr. Sorin would find work on television in the 1950’s and into the early 1960’s, with quite a few guest appearances; his only recurring role on TV, was in, The Goldbergs, 1953-1956, as Simon, on six different episodes.

Louis Sorin also did work in radio, playing Mr. McGillicuddy of the Camel Caravan, which began in 1933; Sorin’s name was commonly seen in the newspapers during the 1930’s, along the host of Camel Caravan, Walter O’Keefe.[5] He could be found voicing the role of Pancho, in The Cisco Kid, which aired on Mutual, from October of 1942 and finished its run in January of 1944.[6] In 1950, on NBC radio, Sorin was part of Cloak and Dagger, an adventure-foreign intrigue program which broadcasted from May through October of that year;[7] the Marriage, which was broadcast (again on NBC radio), from October of 1953 through March of 1954 also had the vocal talents of Mr. Sorin.[8] Often, he would play in stand-alone programs, dramas soon forgotten, but the pay was good and he found work without interruption.[9]

In 1947 Louis Sorin was cast ( Art Carney was also in the production) in a pilot of, Moon Mullins, based on the comic strip, the disc was recorded live before an audience with Al Shirley as the announcer; the project did not make it to the airwaves.[10]

On personal notes, Sorin was a student of painting and devoted much of his spare time to that pursuit[11] and as well, he was active with Actors’ Equity and sat on a committee with the organization in 1942.[12]

 

Sorin, his best known at the movies:

Mother’s Boy, 1929

Lucky in Love, 1929

Animal Crackers, 1930

No Greater Love (voice only), 1943

Seeds of Freedom, 1943

 

By C. S. Williams

 

 

[1] Internet Broadway Data Base

[2] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) December 17, 1941

[3] Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 21, 1942

[4] Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) October 28, 1942

[5] Radio Mirror, March 1937

[6] On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio, by John Dunning, Oxford University Press, 1998

[7] On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio, by John Dunning, Oxford University Press, 1998

[8] On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio, by John Dunning, Oxford University Press, 1998

[9] Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 21, 1942

[10] Billboard, June 21, 1947

[11] Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 21, 1942

[12] Billboard, April 4, 1942

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s